Ensemble Lemniscate is back for the second part of the Trilogie Order-Interference-Noise! Mehdi Hosseini’s Inertia will be performed by Ensemble Lemniscate on February 18-21, 2020 in Switzerland.

Trilogy 19/20 N°2 – Interference
18/02 Kunsthaus Helferei – Zürich
19/02 La Voirie – Biel
21/02 Druckereihalle im Ackermannshof – Basel

Ensemble Lemniscate is a group of international soloists deeply engaged with the music of
our time. Since it’s foundation in 2012, the Basel based Ensemble has kept it’s ears and
eyes close to the present and has been developing a strong dialogue with the young new
music scene. With the philosophy of realizing bold, challenging projects the
ensemble aims to broaden the appreciation of contemporary music both in Switzerland
and abroad.

Mehdi Hosseini’ Sârukhâni III will be performed by the ensemble unitedberlin at the Roudaki Concert Hall, Tehran on Thursday November 14th 2019.
Tehran Travellers is a project by the ensemble unitedberlin dedicated to Iranian contemporary composers. Sârukhâni’s first performance by unitedberlin took place on 20 October 2018 at the Konzerthaus Berlin, conducted by Catherine Larsen-Maguire.

Sârukhâni III is scored for piccolo/flute/bass flute, clarinet (Bb)/contrabass clarinet, percussions, piano, violin, viola and cello. This composition based on folk music material of Kermânshâhân – Sahneh.

On Saturday, October 19, 2019 MolOt Ensemble performed Sârukhâni for its concert, which held at the resonanzraum in Hamburg, Germany. Sârukhâni III is scored for piccolo/flute/bass flute, clarinet (Bb)/contrabass clarinet, percussions, piano, violin, viola and cello. This composition based on folk music material of Kermânshâhân – Sahneh.

Tehran Travellers is a project by the ensemble unitedberlin dedicated to Iranian contemporary composers. Performances will take place on 20 October 2018 at the Konzerthaus Berlin, conducted by Catherine Larsen-Maguire.

Mehdi Hosseini’ Sârukhâni III will be performed by the ensemble unitedberlin along with other compositions by Iranian composers. Sârukhâni III is scored for piccolo/flute/bass flute, clarinet (Bb)/contrabass clarinet, percussions, piano, violin, viola and cello. This composition based on folk music material of Kermânshâhân – Sahneh.

Read a review by Deutschlandradio

Mehdi Hosseini’ Sârukhâni III will be performed by the Ensemble intercontemporain on 21 May 2018 at the Mariinsky Theatre Concert Hall. Sârukhâni III is scored for piccolo/flute/bass flute, clarinet (Bb)/contrabass clarinet, percussions, piano, violin, viola and cello. This composition based on folk music material of Kermânshâhân – Sahneh.

In 1976, Pierre Boulez founded the Ensemble intercontemporain with the support of Michel Guy (who was Minister of Culture at the time) and the collaboration and Nicholas Snowman.

The Ensemble’s 31 soloists share a passion for 20th-21st century music. They are employed on permanent contract, enabling them to fulfill the major aims of the Ensemble: performance, creation and education for young musicians and the general public.

Under the artistic direction of Matthias Pintscher the musicians work in close collaboration with composers, exploring instrumental techniques and developing projects that interweave music, dance, theater, film, video and visual arts.

In collaboration with IRCAM (Institut de Recherche et Coordination Acoustique/Musique), the Ensemble intercontemporain is also active in the field of synthetic sound generation.

New pieces are commissioned and performed on a regular basis with the support of the Fondation Meyer.

The Ensemble is renown for its strong emphasis on music education: concerts for kids, creative workshops for students, training programs for future performers, conductors, composers, etc. Since 2004, the Ensemble soloists have been tutoring young instrumentalists, conductors and composers in the field of contemporary repertoire at the Lucerne Festival Academy, a several week educational project held by the Lucerne Festival.

Resident of the Philharmonie de Paris, the Ensemble performs and records in France and abroad, taking part in major festivals worldwide.
The Ensemble is financed by the Ministry of Culture and Communication and receives additional support from the Paris City Council.

23 December 2018 — Sârukhâni performed by the Contemporary Music Ensemble “eNsemble” conducted by Fyodor Lednev at the New Stage of Alexandrinsky Theatre.

The eNsemble project exists since January 2001. Today it’s a professional body performing all kinds of contemporary music. The eNsemble repertoire includes classical music of the 20th century, works of young composers, post-avant-garde, remakes and arrangements of ancient music, intuitive music and non-standard concepts of concert forms communication. The eNsemble takes part in chamber concerts as well as scaled programs such as multimedia opera productions. In 2003 the group lounged a series of mini-festivals devoted to music of European countries: the Dutch Season, the German Season. The eNsemble also takes part in the Pythian Games, the annual composers’ contest. The ensemble includes young musicians of the Honored group of the Russian Academic Symphonic Philharmonic Orchestra, the Symphonic Orchestra of the Saint Petersburg State Choir as well as other groups. The conductor of the eNsemble has been Fyodor Lednev since its foundation.

Sârukhâni will be performed at the Sound ways New Music Festival by PluralEnsemble (Spain) conducted by Fabián Panisello. This composition is scored for flutes, clarinets, piano, violin and cello. Sârukhâni based on folk music material of the music of Kermanshahan – Sahneh. Sârukhâni ‘s performance will take place in the Glinka Hall of the Saint-Petersburg State Philharmonic on November 20, 2017.

For several seasons, PluralEnsemble has been regularly carrying out both the Cycle of Concerts for the Fundación BBVA de Música Contemporánea in the Auditorio Nacional de Música in Madrid and the Cycle of Soloists for the Fundación BBVA at their headquarters in Madrid and Bilbao, as well as taking part in a series of national and international tours.

Over the years, PluralEnsemble has appeared to great critical and public acclaim in the principal specialised international festivals such as Musica (Strasbourg), A Tempo (Caracas), Présences (Paris), Ars Musica (Brussels), Manca (Nice), Spaziomusica (Cagliari), Aspekte (Salzburg), IFCP Mannes (New York), the Festival de Música of Alicante, Quincena Donostiarra of San Sebastián, Ciclo de la WDR (Cologne), Nous Sons of the Auditori de Barcelona, the Autumn Festival of Warsaw, Ultraschall in Berlin and Klangspuran in Tirol, amongst others; as well as in prestigious concert halls such as the Auditorio 400 of the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía in Madrid and the Berlin Konzerthaus, etc.

PluralEnsemble collaborates with artists such as Peter Eötvös, Salome Kammer, Hilary Summers, Cristóbal Halffter, Marco Blaauw, Jörg Widmann, Dimitri Vassilakis, Nicholas Isherwood , Alda Caiello, Allison Bell, José Manuel López López, Siegfried Mauser, Jorg Widman, Wolfgang Lischke, Cristian Baldini, Nicolas Altstaedt, Zsolt Nagy, César Camarero, Jon Ketilsson, Pablo Márquez, Charlotte Hellekant, Matthias Pintscher, Hansjorg Schellenberger, Tadeusz Wielecki, Lorraine Vaillancourt, Peter Csaba, Johannes Kalitzke, Luis de Pablo o Toshio Hosokawa, amongst others.

PluralEnsemble It has made numerous recordings for the WDR, RBB, RNE, RF, ORF, RTBF radios or the Polish radio, amongst many others, as well as recording CDs for the following labels: Col legno (Munich), Verso (Madrid), Cervantes (Bremen) y NEOS (Munich).

2 October 2017 — The MolOt Ensemble has picked Mehdi Hosseini’s “Sârukhâni III” for its concert, which will be performed at the Sibelius Academy of the University of the Arts Helsinki, Finland.

Tulkinnanvaraista hosts new music ensemble MolOt from St Petersburg, Russia.

MolOt Ensemble was founded in 2012 under the umbrella of Russian Composers’ Union Youth Department. Naturally the group focuses on presenting newest Russian music, but also includes international key works in their repertoire. MolOt organizes its own eponymous festival and has released a CD of works by young Russian composers.

In this concert a wide spectrum of recent music by Russian composers of different generations is heard. Concluding the varied sonic phenomena MolOt performs one of their favourites, “ac/dc” by post-minimalist Michael Gordon. This concert is presented in collaboration with Sibelius Academy, Russian Musical Union and the International MolOt Group.

Tuesday, April 11th 2017
Bka Theater
Mehringdamm 34, 10961 Berlin, Germany

Concert series UNERHOERTE MUSIK

Performers:
Theo Nabicht, Klarinette
Nathan Plante, Trompete
Jean-Claude Velin, Viola

Mehdi HOSSEINI (*1979)
3čhekeh (2017), for trumpet (C), clarinet (Bb) and viola
Based on Folk Music Material of Torbat-e Jam

The Moscow Contemporary Music Ensemble has selected “Inertia” for its concert will be held at the Assembly Hall of the St. Petersburg State University on Thursday, April 6th 2017. Inertia (2014) is scored for clarinet / bass clarinet, piano, violin and violoncello.

The Moscow Contemporary Music Ensemble (MCME) was founded in March, 1990. It consists of the leading Moscow soloists-virtuosos. The MCME’s repertoire includes works by well-known Russian and foreign composers represented all conceptual trends of contemporary music and almost all chamber works of composers-classics of XVIII – XX centuries. It can boast of over 800 world and Russian premieres of its activity as well as has recorded about 40 CDs for the leading world sound-recording companies having extensive distribution facilities (“Olympia”, “Harmonia Mundi”, “Meldac/Triton”, etc.), toured in 40 Russian cities and 20 countries.

 

December 20, 2016
Mehdi Hosseini as a guest composer visit the School of Performing Art of University of Tehran.

December 21, 2016
Mehdi Hosseini is guest composer at the Tehran University of Art

December 24 – January 5, 2017
Composition Masterclass with Mehdi Hosseini at the 5khat Music School

January 5, 2017
Composition Seminar at the 5khat Music School

Moscow première of Inertia will be performed by the Moscow Contemporary Music Ensemble

December 5, 2016 – Mehdi Hosseini’s Inertia will be performed by the Moscow Contemporary Music Ensemble (MCME) at Chamber Hall of Moscow Philharmonic. Inertia I (2014) is scored for clarinet / bass clarinet, piano, violin and violoncello. Concert program dedicated to the 85th anniversary of Sofia Gubaidulina.

The Moscow Contemporary Music Ensemble (MCME) was founded in March, 1990. It consists of the leading Moscow soloists-virtuosos. The MCME’s repertoire includes works by well-known Russian and foreign composers represented all conceptual trends of contemporary music and almost all chamber works of composers-classics of XVIII – XX centuries. It can boast of over 800 world and Russian premieres of its activity as well as has recorded about 40 CDs for the leading world sound-recording companies having extensive distribution facilities (“Olympia”, “Harmonia Mundi”, “Meldac/Triton”, etc.), toured in 40 Russian cities and 20 countries.

December 2, 2016 – Kazan city première of Inertia I. for clarinet/bass clarinet, piano, violin and violoncello will be performed by the Moscow Contemporary Music Ensemble at Kazan National Research Technological University. Concert program dedicated to the 85th anniversary of Sofia Gubaidulina.

The Moscow Contemporary Music Ensemble (MCME) was founded in March, 1990. It consists of the leading Moscow soloists-virtuosos. The MCME’s repertoire includes works by well-known Russian and foreign composers represented all conceptual trends of contemporary music and almost all chamber works of composers-classics of XVIII – XX centuries. It can boast of over 800 world and Russian premieres of its activity as well as has recorded about 40 CDs for the leading world sound-recording companies having extensive distribution facilities (“Olympia”, “Harmonia Mundi”, “Meldac/Triton”, etc.), toured in 40 Russian cities and 20 countries.

Wednesday, November 15th 2016
Moscow House of Composers
18:00

Sârukhâni II, by GAMEnsemble will be performed in the XXXVII International contemporary music festival”Moscow Autumn” at Moscow House of Composers.

This composition is scored for flutes, saxophone soprano/alto, vibraphone, piano, violin, cello and electronics. Sârukhâni based on folk music material of the music of Kermanshahan – Sahneh. Sârukhâni II is version of Mehdi Hosseini’s new work performed recently at the Tchaikovsky Concert Hall, Moscow within the framework of V International Actual Music Festival “Another Space”.

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The Gallery of Actual Music Ensemble (GAMEnsemble) was founded by composer Oleg Paiberdin in 2010 (Moscow, Russia). One of GAMEnsemble’s main purposes is formation of actual zones of modern music art where freely there are basic art strategies – the newest chamber music, improvisational music, visually-acoustic performances and video art, mutually incorporating and creating uniform art process. GAMEnsemble closely cooperates with contemporary composers, artists, choreographers, directors, animators, word and theater masters.

GAMEnsemble constantly collaborates with Moscow State Philharmonie, National Center for Contemporary Arts (NCCA), Pyotr Jurgenson Welfare Fund, Association of Contemporary Music, Russian Composers Union, Music Forum in Moscow, Monopoly Records Independent Label, Polish Cultural Center in Moscow, Record Cinema Centre in Nizhny Novgorod, Autograph New Music Workshop in Yekaterinburg, Sterkh Contemporary Arts Gallery in Surgut, GULAG Museum in Moscow, and others.

tchaikovsky-concert-hall-moscow

On Wednesday 2nd November, World premiere of Sârukhâni  will be performed by the Gallery of Actual Music Ensemble [GAMEnsemble] at Tchaikovsky Concert Hall, Moscow within the framework of V International Actual Music Festival “Another Space”.

The Gallery of Actual Music Ensemble (GAMEnsemble) was founded by composer Oleg Paiberdin in 2010 (Moscow, Russia). One of GAMEnsemble’s main purposes is formation of actual zones of modern music art where freely there are basic art strategies – the newest chamber music, improvisational music, visually-acoustic performances and video art, mutually incorporating and creating uniform art process. GAMEnsemble closely cooperates with contemporary composers, artists, choreographers, directors, animators, word and theater masters.

GAMEnsemble constantly collaborates with Moscow State Philharmonie, National Center for Contemporary Arts (NCCA), Pyotr Jurgenson Welfare Fund, Association of Contemporary Music, Russian Composers Union, Music Forum in Moscow, Monopoly Records Independent Label, Polish Cultural Center in Moscow, Record Cinema Centre in Nizhny Novgorod, Autograph New Music Workshop in Yekaterinburg, Sterkh Contemporary Arts Gallery in Surgut, GULAG Museum in Moscow, and others.

Saturday, March 5th 2016
The Mussorgsky Hall (Mariinsky II)
19:00

Mehdi Hosseini © Monodies.com
Âbkenâri for flute, clarinet, violin and cello will be performed by musicians of the Mariinsky Orchestra in Mussorgsky Hall (Mariinsky II).

Âbkenâri based on folk music material of Gilan. The original tune played when the bride is separated from her family. According to master musicians, it denotes final phase of sorna playing. A showpiece, with free meter, is sometimes accompanied by other instruments.

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Performers:
Alexei Krasheninnikov, violin
Alexander Perecypkin, cello
Maria Arsenieva, flute
Andrei Bezruchko, clarinet
Conductor: Arseny Shuplyakov

15 January 2016 — Huzārag for piano solo performed by Hayk Melikyan  at the Rudaki Concert Hall, Tehran.

Huzarag in Pahlavi or Middle Persian language means: micro, tiny, short,…
This short piece organizes a tonal space which based on the process of devising, trying to find a solution for the skills of improvisation in traditional music of Iran “Dastgah”.

Hayk Melikyan is recognized internationally as one of the most versatile and imaginative performers of the 20th Century and Contemporary Music and among today’s most engaging virtuoso pianists by classical music audiences and critics. His international concert début took place at the Concerto di Concerti International Festival of the 20th Century Music in Rome in 2000. He leads an active concert life, playing throughout Europe, Asia and the Americas. 

After having won the Second Prize in the International Piano Competition of the 20th Century and Contemporary Music Premio Valentino Bucchi in Rome in 2000 he included the contemporary music as the leading part of his concert programs. He is a laureate of many other competitions, such as Yvar Mikhashoff Trust for New Music (Buffalo, USA, 2012), Samson François and André Boucourechliev Prizes at the Orléans International Piano Competition (France, 2008, 2012), First Prize at Lazar Saryan Composers Competition (Yerevan, Armenia, 2008), Special Prize at Ibla Grand Prize Piano Competition (Ragusa, Italy, 1999) etc. Hayk Melikyan was awarded with a Gold Medal by Moscow Composers Union for his contribution and promotion of the World Contemporary Music in 2012. In 2013, Hayk Melikyan was awarded with the Title of an Honorary Artist of the Republic of Armenia.

He is the first performer of numerous works by many composers of our time and dozens of pieces were specially composed for Hayk Melikyan. This activity led the Pianist to an idea of initiating Concert Series of1900+ of the 20th Century and Contemporary World Piano Music launched in 2009. The Series include the works of different composers all over the world composed after the year of 1900. 1900+ aims to promote the Contemporary piano music through the special recitals of Hayk Melikyan, dedicated to different cultures and nations, holding of special competitions for composers, presenting world premiers of new works, publishing new scores and releasing CDs.

Several solo albums by Hayk Melikyan have been released since 2007 and in 2014 his solo album was released by NAXOS. Italian, French, German, Portuguese, Swedish and Swiss radio stations regularly play Hayk Melikyan’s recordings. Hayk Melikyan is regularly conducting master-classes on the Contemporary music worldwide. He is regularly invited to perform in music festivals such as Festival de Valmagne (France), Festival de Musique en Côte de Nacre (France), Festival O/MODƏRNT (Sweden), Geneva Piano Festival (Switzerland), Pharos Contemporary Music Festival (Cyprus), Warsaw Royal Arcades of Art Festival (Poland), Nuovi Spazi Musicali Festival(Italy).

As a composer, Hayk Melikyan is an author of piano solo, chamber, instrumental, vocal and symphonic works. The piano transcriptions, concert paraphrases and arrangements by Hayk Melikyan are among the favorite ones in the repertoires of many pianists worldwide. Hayk Melikyan has earned a reputation as one of the most creative improvisators by world audience, which adds an unusual value to his recitals.

2 November 2015 — Âbkenâri will be performed by the Studio for New Music, Ensemble-in-residence at the Moscow State Tchaikovsky Conservatory. Mehdi Hosseini’s Âbkenâri based on folk music material of Gilan.  This composition scored for flute, clarinet, violin and cello.

Âbkenâri has also been the name of a traditional folk song played in Gilan Province when the bride is separated from her family. According to master musicians, it denotes final phase of sorna playing.  A showpiece, with free meter, is sometimes accompanied by other instruments.

The Studio for New Music (SNM) is the leading contemporary music group in Russia. The ensemble was founded by composer Vladimir Tarnopolski and conductor Igor Dronov in 1993. Their first concert was given in France with Mstislav Rostropovich as conductor. Every year the ensemble performs about 50 programs in Moscow and throughout the country, and is a frequent guest in many Western contemporary music festivals. SNM has performed at such major venues as Berlin Philharmonie, Paradiso Amsterdam, Konzerthaus Berlin, Jacqueline du Pre Concert Hall Oxford, Deutschlandfunk Koeln, Cite de la Musique Paris, Schoenberg Center Vienna, and Festispielhaus Hellerau Dresden among others. They have conducted a variety of workshops at the universities of Oxford, Harvard and Boston to name a few. SNM has been the first and so far the only Russian group which was invited as ensemble-in-residence at the Darmstadt International Courses for New Music in 2010. The group has given many concerts in most of European countries several times touring in USA.

SNM has presented about 60 concert-portraits of the leading contemporary composers. Many of them such as Ivan Fedele, Nicolaus A. Huber, Enno Poppe, Roger Redgate and many others have written their new works especially for the group. Another particular interest is given to all kinds of collaboration with young composers in competitions, workshops, and various other forms. During last years Studio for New Musicactively works on the projects with live electronics, video and multimedia commissioning new works from Russian and European composers as well as promoting in Russia most interesting already existing works such as Romitelli “An Index of Metals” to be premiered in Russia on December 2013. Among vast repertoire of the group, special attention is also given to the Russian Avant-garde of the 1920’s (Gavriil Popov, Nicolai Roslavets, Alexander Mosolov and others). One of the most important events of this kind was the world premiere of the Chamber Symphony No. 2 by Nikolai Roslavets (composed in 1934) which was recently found in an archive.

SNM has premiered about 900 compositions of Russians and foreign composers including national ones. In association with Ensemble Modern, Studio also performed the Russian premiere of Requiem by Henze. In this way it cooperates with other leading foreign ensembles, performing the Russian premieres of pieces by Andriessen, Boulez, Ferneyhough, Grisey, Hurel, Lachenmann, Ligeti, Murail, Rihm, Nono, Stockhausen, and many others.

The Studio for New Music has won status as the ensemble-in-residence at the Moscow Conservatory. It is the core ensemble for the “Moscow Forum” Festival of contemporary music. In 2002, 2005 and 2012 Studio for New Music won the prestigious grants of Ernst von Siemens Musikstiftung for several two-years anthological series of concerts in Moscow and Russian regions. In 2010 Studio for New Music won the grant of European Commission for the realization of the large-scale project “Europe through the eyes of Russians. Russia through the eyes of Europeans” with 18 new compositions by Russian and European composers commissioned.

Proton Bern Ensemble

Thursday, May 21st 2015
Mariinsky Theatre Concert Hall
19:00

proton bern (Switzerland)
Conductor: Matthias Kuhn

Mehdi HOSSEINI (*1979)
Inertia (2014), for clarinet / bass clarinet, piano, violin and violoncello

Performers:
Richard Haynes, clarinets/bass clarinet
Samuel Fried, piano
Maximilian Haft, violin
Jan-Filip Ťupa, cello

 

The ensemble Proton Bern was founded by participants of the Boswil New Music Seminars, one of the greatest forums of contemporary music. The orchestra enjoys fruitful collaborations with such renowned conductors and composers as Beat Furrer, Klaus Huber, William Blank, Vladimir Tarnopolski and Vinko Globokar. At the invitation of Beat Furrer the ensemble recorded two CDs of his music with Musique Suisse.

One defining character of the orchestra is the incredibly unusual format of its performers, varying from small chamber ensembles to a larger orchestra. In addition to its concerts in Switzerland and internationally, the ensemble regularly appears with programmes in its home town of Bern. These have included the themed concerts protonam montag, as well as the Protonwerk workshop for young composers run in collaboration with the Pro Helvetia Swiss Arts Council.As part of the Protonwerk project composers are given the opportunity to collaborate with the ensemble’s musicians at every stage of a work’s creation, from the commission to the first public performance.

Proton Bern is also the main orchestra of the Dampfzentrale Bern, an organisation that aims to popularise new music. In the 2012–2013 season on the initiative of the Gare du Nord concert society of contemporary music in Basel the orchestra was awarded the title “Ensembleof the Year”.

24 Jun 2014 — Monodies for ensemble will be performed at the Jaani Kirik Concert Hall, St. Petersburg. Performance by Moscow Contemporary Music Ensemble (MCME).

The Monodies by Mehdi Hosseini was completed in 2011. The work is scored for flute, Clarinet, piano, violin and Violoncello. The world premiere of Hosseini’s composition “Monodies” was on 21 November 2011 as part of the opening day of the 23rd Annual International New Music Festival “Sound Ways”, in the St. Petersburg Philharmonic and performed by the Sound Ways New Music Ensemble. Hosseini’s “Monodies” dedicated to Italian 20th-century composer Luciano Berio. The name “Monodies” has been used quite often in the composer’s works, he is devoting a significant amount of attention to the embodiment of his musical ideas into a single-voiced style, using the sounds of the traditional music of Persia and mixing them with western trends.

Moscow Contemporary Music Ensemble (MCME) was founded in 1990 by Yuri Kasparov, under the patronage of the famous Russian composer Edison Denisov. The ensemble focuses on promoting 20th and 21st century music. It is Russia’s foremost contemporary chamber ensemble and consists of some of the best Russian musicians specializing in modern music. MCME has strong educational goals and works closely with both Russian and international cultural foundations to bring contemporary music to a wide range of audiences. As part of this goal, MCME has organized the International Young Composers Academy (Tchaikovsky City, Ural) to bring together both young composers and internationally recognized composers in workshops.

The ensemble’s repertoire is quite extensive and has included the premiere of almost 800 different works. Particularly, they champion the music of Russian composers of the 1920’s and ‘30’s, such as Nikolai Roslavets and Alexander Mosolov. Additionally, they regularly perform music by “Shestidesyatniki” (1960’s Russian) composers.

MCME regularly performs in many diverse locales across Russia (80 cities) and elsewhere in the world, including Armenia, Austria, Belorussia, Czech Republic, Cyprus, Denmark, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Japan, Lithuania, Macedonia, Moldova, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Spain, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, Uzbekistan and USA. MCME performed on the best concert stages, took part in the biggest international festivals such as “Moscow Biennale for Contemporary Art”, “DiaghilevFest” (Russia, Perm), “Radio-France presences” (Paris), “FrankfurtFest”, “Maerzmusik” (Germany), “Gaudeamus music week”, “The Night of the Unexpected” (the Netherlands), “Warsaw Autumn” (Poland), “Klangspuren” (Austria) and other. MCME has recorded more than 40 CDs for leading CD labels, including Olympia (UK), Harmonia Mundi (France), Triton (Japan), Donemus (The Netherlands), Fancymusic (Russia), etc. Each season MCME gives around 70 concerts in Russia and abroad. The special place in repertoire is allocated for music of young Russian and foreign composers. The ensemble also takes active part in the international multimedia and theatrical projects. In 2009 MCME became the winner of the Award ACTION in support of theatrical initiatives. In 2013 MCME got the Award GOLDEN MASK.

mmm

April 21, 2014: World première of Chakuk, for flute and violin in Tokyo. Performance by mmm…

mmm…  (em em em 3 dots) is a Tokyo-based collective dedicated to musical exchange with young composers around the world. They are on a journey to discover exciting new compositions wherever they’re being written…, and their programmes will be filled with Japanese and world premieres by composers introduced to them by other composers in a circle of friends that allows them to constantly discover fresh talent.

World première of Abkenari for flute, clarinet, violin and cello. Commissioned by XXV International New Music Festival “Sound Ways”. The Abkenari by Mehdi Hosseini was completed in  October 27, 2011 and it based on folk music material of Gilan.

Saint Petersburg State Philharmonic (Glinka Hall)
Performance by Sound Ways New Music Ensemble
Conductor: Maxim Valkov

The “Sound Ways” New Music Ensemble was founded in St. Petersburg by the Russian composer Aleksandr Radvilovich in 1994,  for the purpose of promoting the music of contemporary Russian and International composers  in Saint-Petersburg, Russia.

May 25, 2013: Monodies for ensemble will be performed by Studio for New Music (SNM).

The Studio for New Music (SNM) is the leading contemporary music group in Russia. The ensemble was founded by composer Vladimir Tarnopolski and conductor Igor Dronov in 1993. Their first concert was given in France with Mstislav Rostropovich as conductor. Every year the ensemble performs about 50 programs in Moscow and throughout the country, and is a frequent guest in many Western contemporary music festivals. SNM has performed at such major venues as Berlin Philharmonie, Paradiso Amsterdam, Konzerthaus Berlin, Jacqueline du Pre Concert Hall Oxford, Deutschlandfunk Koeln, Cite de la Musique Paris, Schoenberg Center Vienna, and Festispielhaus Hellerau Dresden among others. They have conducted a variety of workshops at the universities of Oxford, Harvard and Boston to name a few. SNM has been the first and so far the only Russian group which was invited as ensemble-in-residence at the Darmstadt International Courses for New Music in 2010. The group has given many concerts in most of European countries several times touring in USA.

The Monodies by Mehdi Hosseini was completed in 2011. The work is scored for flute, Clarinet, piano, violin and Violoncello. The world premiere of Hosseini’s composition “Monodies” was on 21 November 2011 as part of the opening day of the 23rd Annual International New Music Festival “Sound Ways”, in the Glinka Hall of the St. Petersburg Philharmonic.  The work performed by the Sound Ways New Music Ensemble under the direction of conductor Brad Cawyer. Hosseini’s “Monodies” dedicated to Italian 20th-century composer Luciano Berio. The name “Monodies” has been used quite often in the composer’s works, he is devoting a significant amount of attention to the embodiment of his musical ideas into a single-voiced style, using the sounds of the traditional music of Persia and mixing them with western trends.

On March 1, 2013 in the Glazunov concert hall at the St. Petersburg Conservatory named after N.A. Rimsky-Korsakov,  “Hesar” for Symphony Orchestra will be performed by the Symphony Orchestra of the Opera and Ballet Theatre of the St. Petersburg State Conservatory under the direction of conductor Alim Shakh. “Hesar” was written in February 2013 on the basis of traditional Iranian music system “dastgah.” “Hesar” in Persian means “fortress” and it is one  part of the Iranian dastgah called “Chahargah.”

The Persian composer Mehdi Hosseini often uses the word “Monodies” not only as the title of this album, but also as a musical term/system; by which he means the characteristics of single voice structures, adapting themselves to any musical texture. The album “Monodies” was released in Tehran in 2011. For this album Hosseini has selected the compositions he has written based on the folk music of Persia (Iran). The pieces were recorded in Russia by soloists, ensembles, the Saint Petersburg State Philharmonic Orchestra and the State Academic Orchestra. All of the compositions were written between 2003 and 2009.

Download Booklet

  1. Concerto for String Quartet and Chamber Orchestra Mehdi Hosseini Try Amazon Prime Music 16:34
  2. Peshtpa Mehdi Hosseini Try Amazon Prime Music 6:18
  3. Taleshi Hava Mehdi Hosseini Try Amazon Prime Music 2:32
  4. Baluch I. Liku Dalgani Mehdi Hosseini Try Amazon Prime Music 2:55
  5. Baluch II. Kalampour Mehdi Hosseini Try Amazon Prime Music 1:46
  6. Baluch III. Zoljalal Guati Mehdi Hosseini Try Amazon Prime Music 3:43
  7. Symphony of Monody Mehdi Hosseini Try Amazon Prime Music 18:13
© by Sami Hyrskylahti.  Mehdi Hosseini observes a St. Petersburg State Philharmonic Orchestra rehearsal.

Glancing through Mehdi Hosseini’s works at the advent of his course as a composer (Symphony of Monody and String Quartet No. 1), we encounter a sort of confusion and inability to separate from conservative doctrines. This can be seen with all composers without exception. The influence of master composers upon new composers is inevitable and undeniable. This is true in the case of Hosseini’s initial works. He has been under the influence of Shostakovich, Stravinsky, Amirov’s heavy shadow and other Russian composers. This is a privilege for him because it signifies his mastery over the heavy expression of Russian composing. This achievement can only be accomplished by extensive studies and spending much time on analyzing works with the final result being the complete mastery of these masters’ works. Speaking the language of others is a very complicated and difficult task, especially if it is done so well that the speaker is difficult to recognize.

This problem has been resolved by the passing of time; and with a look at his new works we see a fresh independence and a very personal new language.

It goes without saying that the use of Persian folk themes has assisted him in finding this expressive independence as quickly as possible. Hosseini’s approach towards his native materials music takes a different path from what has been done in the field before. The 20th-century Persian composers, in general, have approached the folk music in a limited way, transcribing the melodies for western instruments, ensembles and orchestras. The following composers tried to change this atmosphere: Samin Baghcheban “Boumivar” [In a Traditional Way] and “Sholey” [The Sun], Loris Tjeknavorian “Armenian Bagatelles“, Mohammad-Taghi Massoudieh “Two Movements for String Orchestra”, Iradj Sahbai “Three Folk Inventions”, and Reza Vali “Deylámân“. All these composers have found a kind of harmony and counterpoint based upon melodic structures embedded in the heart of this ethnic music and have founded their composing principles based solely on this music. Of course most of them have been loyal to the formal structure of the music and restricted themselves from violating these structures. By following these guidelines, they show respect for the music and its originality.

Mehdi Hosseini has arrived at these same conclusions as well. The difference being that he has treated harmony and counterpoint in the simplest way and has stayed loyal to the basic structure (monadic in his words) of ethnic music. On one hand, he has been loyal to this tradition in pieces such as Talesh Weather and on the other hand he has used the developmental tradition of western conservative music in such pieces as “The Concerto for String Quartet” and second movement Kalampoor of Baluch. Although this kind of development runs parallel with western academic traditions, it is in fact completely different and more in line with the methods of such modernists and post-modernists as Messiaen, Stockhausen and Forer and perhaps it is a method of development, which can be said to be completely his own. Development in Hosseini’s works is formed according to basic qualities and structures, which are similar to the narrations of local musicians. In actuality, each work is comprised of a set of common aesthetics and musical characteristics, which act as the building blocks of Hosseini’s works and at the same time enjoy their own independent musical lives.

Another important point that should be considered, when looking at Hosseini’s works, is his education in ethnomusicology. It is a major asset, which has been assisting him in the composition and formation of the independent identity of his works. The most important way in which this science has been helping him is in the recognition of the different aspects of ethnic music. He has separated them according to their rhythmic, melodic, homophonic and polyphonic elements. These elements now reappear within the context of Hosseini’s personal language

In fact, to describe Hosseini’s method of composing in the simplest way, we can say that his work follows the following pattern:
– Transcription of the original and initial version performed by local musicians;
– Separation of the different rhythmic and melodic elements;
– Designation of the structure and outline of the work;
– Placement and layering of the different elements in the designated structure;
– Rearrangement of familiar patterns by the use of frequent repetitions and transformations of the rhythmic, melodic elements.

In all of his works, the main thematic materials of the piece are presented at the beginning of the work so that the listener has an opportunity to become familiar with the elements, which will later be transformed and developed. (An excellent example of how Hosseini transforms rhythmic, melodic patterns can be seen in the piece “The Back of the Feet”). All of these elements are repeated so much that the changes that Hosseini makes become particles, which atomically transform the homophonic and polyphonic textures of the work. This forward moving process, which is not entirely disclosed, eventually changes the whole essence of the piece. Of course, the concept of change here is quite different from the changes in other composers’ works; that is to say, the listener is exposed to an extraordinary change; a kind of transformation or abstraction of a recognizable object. Something that is being transformed is still recognizable. In some works, like in the second part of Baluch: Kalampoor, Hosseini uses material, intended originally to accompany the main melody in the original piece, in the form of a bizarre collage. He does this at various times, finding an independence from and at the same time a dependence on the original material, in order to use the rhythmic, melodic patterns in a way that does not follow the expectations of the listener.

The featured piece in this collection is the Concerto for String Quartet and Chamber Orchestra. This work, which represents the peak of Hosseini’s expertise, implies many cultural and linguistic issues and structures. The points seen as chords in the piece do not refer to pointillism, but they are pauses, which are to be regarded as the expression of successive new statements.

The dialogue among the four solo string instruments attempting to be heard through the tumult of orchestral sounds is a musical metaphor for the cultural status of the tribes of Iran. In this piece, Husseini reproduces the absurdity and multi-cultural aspect of societal and popular culture and conversations with the use of the orchestra. He represents the tumult of a society in which ethnic cultural elements are evident but cannot be easily heard. This society speaks in a language that is beyond understanding, even for itself, but the cultural identity of this disrupted society can still be found. Return to the origin is the theme that runs through Hosseini’s works. He eventually returns to the main elements of the music at the end of each work; and by re-expressing it after various diversions and transformations, he reaches out to grasp a commemoration of the albeit transformed past.

For Hosseini, the final goal is not dependent on past but at the same time progression cannot be achieved without an understanding of what has already been. He considers that the past and the future are interrelated in a complementary way.

– Mohsen Saghafi

The Bakhtiari are one of Iran’s native peoples. The nation comprises the Khaftlang and Chaharlang tribes, which live in the provinces of Chaharmahal and Bakhtiari, Isfahan and Loresân. Chaharmahal and Bakhtiari province is located in southwest Iran. The Bakhtiari dialect belongs to the group of Western Iranian languages, and its speakers have a rich and flourishing traditional folk culture.

Music is one of the most important elements of traditional folk culture, as it displays the intellectual values and character of the people.  Bakhtari music is among the richest and most extensive varieties of Persian maqam music.

The traditions and customs of the Bakhtiari are reflected in the names of their magham. In the musical terminology of the Bakhtiari people, ‘magham’ usually means ‘tune’ (not a specific tonality or ‘mode’ as it is typically interpreted, but an entire system of pitches and pitch relationships), since for them the word magham implies an established musical text, which might vary in character, form, and even genre.

The magham are formed on the basis of traditional Persian system-scales (Dastgah). The most predominant among these are Shur, Avaz-e Dashti, Avaz-e Shushtari, Dastgah-e Chahār’gāh, and Se’gāh.

Although Bakhtiari music has much in common with the musical culture of other regions of Iran, much distinguishes it, as well, including dialect, instrumentation, and the method of transition from one maqam into another.

The instruments most frequently used in Bakhtiari music are the sornā; korna; ney; dayereh; dohol; and kamancheh. The kamancheh, apparently was first used at a later period than the others. In the past decade, many toushmali, i.e. Bakhtiari musicians, have played the tār and tombak in addition to the instruments listed above.

Like the music of other regions of Persia, that of the Bakhtiari can be classified in various ways and according to a number of parameters. There is distinct music for festive occasions, such as weddings or funerals; there is music to accompany recitation of epic poetry; and there are songs to accompany work, among other genres.

The string quartet №.2 makes use of popular Bakhtiari folk tunes, each of which belongs to a certain magham.

The first movement is based on a fragment of the melody “Tipumey” in the Magham of Gahgeriyu or Gugeriyu, which is a song of mourning, the name of which is translated as ‘a time for weeping.’ Another name for this maqam, Gugeriyu or Gahgiri, likewise means ‘time to mourn.’ At present, the genre of music for mourning continues to exist in Bakhtiari funeral music; and, although the genre no longer serves as a strictly observed ritual in the traditional sense, the general funereal character of the music is evident. It is specifically the maqam Gahgeriyu that places the tune within the genre of mournful music.

For a better understanding of the title ‘Gahgeriyu,’ we look to the figure of Alidad Noudalkosh. Alidad is a courageous and bold hero of the Bakhtiari people, murdered by his brother in a fit of envy. Alidad could defeat nine Griffon vultures with the shot of a single arrow. Musicians and mourners composed more than a few laments for Alidad and perform them in the maqam Gahgeriyu. The singers improvise their musical-poetic compositions, which praise the moral and physical strength of the hero in the maqam Tipumey. Others gather and join in, and the emotional impact of sorrowful sounds can rarely be surpassed.

– Mehdi Hosseini

 

Symphony of Monody is based on regional music material of Lorestan – specifically the Khosro-Shirin (Sangin Samâ). The Symphony is in one movement, with what can be called a sonata-cycle form while, at the same time, adhering to the multi movement structure of a more traditional symphony through its embedded internal structure, including an expanded development and intensive variation.

The Symphony begins and ends on a single axis – with a solo voice in the clarinet – carrying with it a strong philosophic significance for eastern mentality.

The theme is taken from Khosrow and Shirin and was transcribed by Hosseini from a recording by the folklorist Mirza Moradi. At the beginning it is presented as solo voice, but then rapidly develops with different variations and mixing polymagam sound structures, heterophony and vakhan – a unique musical configuration found in the Persian instrumental tradition – bringing to a conclusion the Symphony’s exposition.
On the whole, the composer has endeavored to reveal the importance of multi sound forms used in eastern music as well as the rich heritage of regional music – all within a mono-thematic symphonic design – as a testimony to the Persian musical character and spirit.

This collection is the result of, and inspired by, research into the astonishing variety of regional folk music to be found across Persia (Iran), and particularly into the structure of magham music.

Throughout Persia the culture of regional folk music, from the point of view of composition, owes much of its specific character and purity to the relationship between notation, improvisation and the very specific usage of melody and rhythm. Without a doubt, this also directly affects the internal structure of this type of music.

The most common belief surrounding Persian music is that it is based on the modal system. However, some problems with this opinion present themselves on closer examination of the functional organisation and sound material of the music itself. At the heart of the matter in the music on this recording is the question of how Persian regional music relates to a monodic structure that can be perceived as both functional within itself, and simultaneously connecting to modal and macro/micro tonal systems. But ultimately, these works can be generally understood as experimental compositions proposing a new view towards the regional music Persia.

− Timothy Dunne